Archive | July 2012

Born in the 80’s – Childhood memories

For me, being born in the 80’s was one of the greatest things ever! I personally feel that we were the last generation of kids who actually “lived” a kids life.There are so many fond memories from being a kid that I’m not even sure where to begin.

So I’ve decided to list all my favourite childhood memories, and hope that one day my kids would read this and laugh til their tummies hurt

    • Playing outside ALL of the time, and only going into the house when you were called to bath
    • Break dancing on polished floors (more like believing that we could)
    • Having our hair crimped and combed over to one side
    • Wearing a banana slides
    • Using plastic bangles, and we’d burn it and stick it if it broke

      Plastic bangles

  • Every girl had a crush on one of the guys from New Kids on the Block
  • We remember what Michael Jackson looked like before surgery
  • Everybody knew MC Hammer
  • I still know the words to “Ice ice baby”
  • We would make cassettes for our friends (recorded off the radio)

 

Our cassette collections
  • We almost never watched tv, (only 3 Channels)
  • Reading Nancy Drew, Hardy boys, Famous Five and Sweet valley high
  • David Hasselhoff was the coolest person ever!
  • Favourite tv show, Airwolf, McGyver, Highwayman, The A Team
  • Brakenjan was on at family viewing time 18:30

 

The Three Musketeers aka Brakenjan
  • Wearing neon coloured cycling tights under shorts,
  • (With leg warmers)….Or this is how you wanted to dress
  • Saying wax on / wax off now, sounds like a secret code
  • Still wanting to do karate and ballet
  • Telling each others fortune with a Quack Quack

    “Quack Quack”

  • Owning a lyric book, (I’m certain a lot of it was incorrect)
  • In cricket season, the road would turn the road into a pitch
  • The year 2000 meant we’d be living on the moon with silver suits
  • We had play names, Kelly, Brenda, Dona
  • We took tons of photos and the spools were never developed

 

Sketch of a spool

This list could go on and on….So please feel free to share your childhood memories

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Learning to be Happy

Although most people believe happiness is essential, it is often dependent on factors outside of themselves.
From what I have learned, is that happiness has less to do with your circumstances! And all the happiness you will ever need resides within you. Finding happiness within, is not discovered overnight, nor is it something that is taught to you. But it can be discovered by changing our thinking and habits.Here I will share a few of my guidelines used on my journey to being happy!

Be the optimist – After reading The Secret in 2006, I have made a decision; I will never, or at least try, to never be the pessimist. The Laws of Attraction made a lot of sense, and I decided, that is how I will go through life. By being the optimist, I choose to see the bright side. All the obstacles or hard times I’m faced with is seen as temporary. And yes, sometimes it’s not easy, but I’ve learned to respond to life’s challenges with confidence knowing that I can handle them. When problems or challenges are resolved,I usually look back on them and try to make sense of it, sort of, find the meaning and purpose. By doing this, I noticed that each obstacle or challenge makes it easier to be optimistic about, because I know that they’re there for a reason, even if I may not know what it is now.

Happiness is a choice – Choose to be happy! To increase inner happiness, I have learnt to make a deliberate decision to do so. A lot of times we blame others for our unhappiness. And we are all guilty of that, we have all blamed parents, teachers, bosses, because it’s easier to push the responsibility onto someone else. Stop! We alone are responsible for our actions, and reactions! Whether we’re in unhappy relationships, or unhappy in our jobs, the unhappiness still lies within ourselves. You have a choice, to stay and be unhappy, or change your attitude! And the attitude comes from within. And its this attitude that determines whether we’re going to be happy or not!

Clear the clutter – This is by far one of the hardest things to do, but its well worth it – Clear your mental clutter!and make more room for happiness. Of all the things that require your mental energy, make the distinction between things that are really important and things that are not. Actively release thoughts, worries, resentments, etc. that consume your mental space. Without unnecessary things to clutter your mind, you’ll have more room for things that add to your joy.

Enjoying nature – Bridal veil falls – Sabie

Live your Bliss – We all have that one or two things that makes us extremely happy! If you still do not know what it is, take time out, observe yourself, learn what makes you truly happy, and add more of it to your life. It is that simple.
Recognize your passion, respect your goals! Find things that bring you happiness, and do them in your own unique way.

Stop comparing – And trying to keep up with the Joneses. That is the number one cause of our own unhappiness. Having things might make you appear trendy and happy to everyone else, but it doesn’t make you happy inside. But happiness, as the saying goes, is not in getting what you want, but in wanting what you already have!

Give – I saved this one for last, because this one is the easiest, and hardest!(for many people) By giving, it doesn’t have to have any monetary value. It can be anything from a compliment to a smile, a hug or a pat on the back! When you make someone else happy, you find yourself being twice as happy inside!

You now know how to find happiness within yourself, and it is something you can access all the time regardless of your circumstance or situation. Be an optimist, intentionally choose to be happy, clear your mind of unnecessary clutter, and find ways to nurture your own unique bliss. This simple strategy will allow you to access your inner joy at all times.

This is a personal blog. The views and opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of the people, institutions or organizations that I may or may not be related with unless stated explicitly.

Also, my thoughts and opinions change from time to time as I come to learn more and develop my understanding about the things and issues that I am blogging about. This blog just provides a snapshot of the knowledge, views, and opinions that I hold at a particular point of time and these might most probably change over a period of time. I reserve the right to evolve my knowledge, thoughts, and viewpoints over time and to change them without assigning any reason.

My blog includes links to other sites/blogs operated by third parties. These are provided as a means of convenient access to you to the information/opinion contained therein. I am in no way responsible for the content of any other sites or any products or services that may be offered through other sites.
February 01, 2012
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I am not responsible for the content in comments other than those made by me, or in blogs or other online content that I may link to.

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I’ll be Happy when I’m Thin?!

Real Women has curves

For many years, I was convinced that by changing my body, I would change my life. I believed that when the weight disappeared, it would take away old wounds, hurts, and rejections with it. I thought that changing the shape on the outside would alter the feelings on the inside.

Yeah… Right?

I mistakenly believed that altering my body will fix everything. That’s because I thought that body size is the cause and, therefore, the healer of all wounds. Perhaps my worst mistake was believing that being thin equalled being loved, being special, being cherished and being happy. I couldn’t be more wrong.
I thought life would be greater if I were thinner. That I would be happier. That I would love myself more and be loved even more.
When all along it was inner happiness I’ve always wanted! But instead of putting my energy and attention there, I always concentrated on the size of my body. Now, I have never been a big girl, but I was always bigger than what society expected.

And let’s just say, people will let you know when “they” think you’re getting “fat”. And in earlier years, when I would hear these comments, I would consume food containing approximately 1000 calories a day for 2 weeks, and know that I’d drop at least 2kg (Which I will just put back on when I returned to normal eating). But now, if someone said that me, I take it with pinch of salt.For me it was a constant roller roaster of having great days and of course, fat days.

Over the past year, I have started to look at life through different eyes. I have realised that it’s not about how the world looks at me, but rather, about how I look at the world. I’m never going to be perfect, not even to the people who loves me most, But….I can be perfect to myself, for myself…..

By spending all this time wanting to be in a body that I would never fit into, I just made myself more miserable inside, which I would, in turn take out on the outside, and so the sick cycle would continue!
So my message to you: being thinner will never do what you think it’s going to do. But you can have whatever you believe that being thinner will give you, and you can have it now. The only way to do it? By starting to live as though you love yourself. By making a commitment to be kind to yourself and by not letting anything stand in your way. By setting aside time for yourself daily. By beginning today.

Follow no diet rules, Suffer no fat insults, Don’t deprive yourself of the pleasure of life!
Love your curves, I love mine

“Ugly” Witbank?

I am one of those people who doesn’t take well to criticism (especially when it’s close to home).

Today, during a conversation, (which I was not part off, just listening in), somebody said “Witbank is such an ugly town”. At that moment, I felt my face shrink! with anger! Why? beacuse it’s my hometown, and how dare someone make such an absurd statement after visiting the town (well it is officially a city) once, to watch a rugby game! It would mean that the person

drove straight of the N12 and down Watermeyer street to get to the @lantic Stadium. If that’s all that was seen, how can say that the place is ugly? Ok, in all honesty, maybe it’s not the prettiest, but there is some greatness to it;

Firstly, Witbank is home to the largest municipal dam in South Africa, Witbank dam! And yes, the resort might not be as well kept as it use to be, but the dam is still beautiful. (There’s just something about water that I find to be very relaxing). Ok, so Witbank might not have pretty gardens or parks to boast, there aren’t 50 soulless malls or museums that no one cares to visit, but if it weren’t for “ugly Wibank”, the whole of Joburg would probably be without electricity. Which brings me to my second point

Coal; Most of the country’s coal is currently mined in the Witbank and Ermelo coalfields. Witbank coalfield is by far the most important source of South Africa’s mined coal at present. Surely that should count for something.

Then of course, Witbank is home to Witbank Spurs and the @lantic Pumas, which was at some point coached by Chester Williams, and not forgetting the super great Duane Vermeulen started his career in “ugly Witbank”

Duane Vermeulen WP flanker

I’m not clued up with social scene at the moment, but I do know that with the limited entertainment we had, we made the best of it. Whether it was hanging out at the Ridge Casino, shooting pool at Cheekies, dancing the night away (ok maybe not night, but a few hours) at Memphis Belle, or spending Sunday afternoon in the park……Growing up in a small town was the best thing ever!

Confession; maybe I didn’t want to defend Witbank as a whole, but rather my life in Witbank. And if you live in Witbank; please do not call it Sh!tbank, it is not cool!

I still love that City

Mandela Day

So I decided to start blogging a while ago, but never really got around to actually do it. So this morning I decided to start!

18 July 2012, The 94th birthday of the iconic Mr Nelson Mandela! What an honour it is to be part of this generation!I will be posting pics on how we spent our 67 min giving back!

Happy Birthday Tata!

Remarks by Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on 11 February 11, 1990 after his release from Victor Verster

NELSON MANDELA’S ADDRESS TO RALLY IN CAPE TOWN ON HIS RELEASE FROM PRISON

11 February 1990

Friends, comrades and fellow South Africans.

I greet you all in the name of peace, democracy and freedom for all.

I stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant of you, the people. Your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. I therefore place the remaining years of my life in your hands.

On this day of my release, I extend my sincere and warmest gratitude to the millions of my compatriots and those in every corner of the globe who have campaigned tirelessly for my release.

I send special greetings to the people of Cape Town, this city which has been my home for three decades. Your mass marches and other forms of struggle have served as a constant source of strength to all political prisoners.

I salute the African National Congress. It has fulfilled our every expectation in its role as leader of the great march to freedom.

I salute our President, Comrade Oliver Tambo, for leading the ANC even under the most difficult circumstances.

I salute the rank and file members of the ANC. You have sacrificed life and limb in the pursuit of the noble cause of our struggle.

I salute combatants of Umkhonto we Sizwe, like Solomon Mahlangu and Ashley Kriel who have paid the ultimate price for the freedom of all South Africans.

I salute the South African Communist Party for its sterling contribution to the struggle for democracy. You have survived 40 years of unrelenting persecution. The memory of great communists like Moses Kotane, Yusuf Dadoo, Bram Fischer and Moses Mabhida will be cherished for generations to come.

I salute General Secretary Joe Slovo, one of our finest patriots. We are heartened by the fact that the alliance between ourselves and the Party remains as strong as it always was.

I salute the United Democratic Front, the National Education Crisis Committee, the South African Youth Congress, the Transvaal and Natal Indian Congresses and COSATU and the many other formations of the Mass Democratic Movement.

I also salute the Black Sash and the National Union of South African Students. We note with pride that you have acted as the conscience of white South Africa. Even during the darkest days in the history of our struggle you held the flag of liberty high. The large-scale mass mobilisation of the past few years is one of the key factors which led to the opening of the final chapter of our struggle.

I extend my greetings to the working class of our country. Your organised strength is the pride of our movement. You remain the most dependable force in the struggle to end exploitation and oppression.

I pay tribute to the many religious communities who carried the campaign for justice forward when the organisations for our people were silenced.

I greet the traditional leaders of our country – many of you continue to walk in the footsteps of great heroes like Hintsa and Sekhukune.

I pay tribute to the endless heroism of youth, you, the young lions. You, the young lions, have energised our entire struggle.

I pay tribute to the mothers and wives and sisters of our nation. You are the rock-hard foundation of our struggle. Apartheid has inflicted more pain on you than on anyone else.

On this occasion, we thank the world community for their great contribution to the anti-apartheid struggle. Without your support our struggle would not have reached this advanced stage. The sacrifice of the frontline states will be remembered by South Africans forever.

My salutations would be incomplete without expressing my deep appreciation for the strength given to me during my long and lonely years in prison by my beloved wife and family. I am convinced that your pain and suffering was far greater than my own.

Before I go any further I wish to make the point that I intend making only a few preliminary comments at this stage. I will make a more complete statement only after I have had the opportunity to consult with my comrades.

Today the majority of South Africans, black and white, recognise that apartheid has no future. It has to be ended by our own decisive mass action in order to build peace and security. The mass campaign of defiance and other actions of our organisation and people can only culminate in the establishment of democracy. The destruction caused by apartheid on our sub-continent is in- calculable. The fabric of family life of millions of my people has been shattered. Millions are homeless and unemployed. Our economy lies in ruins and our people are embroiled in political strife. Our resort to the armed struggle in 1960 with the formation of the military wing of the ANC, Umkhonto we Sizwe, was a purely defensive action against the violence of apartheid. The factors which necessitated the armed struggle still exist today. We have no option but to continue. We express the hope that a climate conducive to a negotiated settlement will be created soon so that there may no longer be the need for the armed struggle.

I am a loyal and disciplined member of the African National Congress. I am therefore in full agreement with all of its objectives, strategies and tactics.

The need to unite the people of our country is as important a task now as it always has been. No individual leader is able to take on this enormous task on his own. It is our task as leaders to place our views before our organisation and to allow the democratic structures to decide. On the question of democratic practice, I feel duty bound to make the point that a leader of the movement is a person who has been democratically elected at a national conference. This is a principle which must be upheld without any exceptions.

Today, I wish to report to you that my talks with the government have been aimed at normalising the political situation in the country. We have not as yet begun discussing the basic demands of the struggle. I wish to stress that I myself have at no time entered into negotiations about the future of our country except to insist on a meeting between the ANC and the government.

Mr. De Klerk has gone further than any other Nationalist president in taking real steps to normalise the situation. However, there are further steps as outlined in the Harare Declaration that have to be met before negotiations on the basic demands of our people can begin. I reiterate our call for, inter alia, the immediate ending of the State of Emergency and the freeing of all, and not only some, political prisoners. Only such a normalised situation, which allows for free political activity, can allow us to consult our people in order to obtain a mandate.

The people need to be consulted on who will negotiate and on the content of such negotiations. Negotiations cannot take place above the heads or behind the backs of our people. It is our belief that the future of our country can only be determined by a body which is democratically elected on a non-racial basis. Negotiations on the dismantling of apartheid will have to address the over- whelming demand of our people for a democratic, non-racial and unitary South Africa. There must be an end to white monopoly on political power and a fundamental restructuring of our political and economic systems to ensure that the inequalities of apartheid are addressed and our society thoroughly democratised.

It must be added that Mr. De Klerk himself is a man of integrity who is acutely aware of the dangers of a public figure not honouring his undertakings. But as an organisation we base our policy and strategy on the harsh reality we are faced with. And this reality is that we are still suffering under the policy of the Nationalist government.

Our struggle has reached a decisive moment. We call on our people to seize this moment so that the process towards democracy is rapid and uninterrupted. We have waited too long for our freedom. We can no longer wait. Now is the time to intensify the struggle on all fronts. To relax our efforts now would be a mistake which generations to come will not be able to forgive. The sight of freedom looming on the horizon should encourage us to redouble our efforts.

It is only through disciplined mass action that our victory can be assured. We call on our white compatriots to join us in the shaping of a new South Africa. The freedom movement is a political home for you too. We call on the international community to continue the campaign to isolate the apartheid regime. To lift sanctions now would be to run the risk of aborting the process towards the complete eradication of apartheid.

Our march to freedom is irreversible. We must not allow fear to stand in our way. Universal suffrage on a common voters’ role in a united democratic and non-racial South Africa is the only way to peace and racial harmony.

In conclusion I wish to quote my own words during my trial in 1964. They are true today as they were then:

‘I have fought against white domination and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which am prepared to die.’

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